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Dan River Power Station

Owned and Operated by Duke Energy Corporation

The data below is compiled from
the Energy Information Administration Form 860,
the Environmental Protection Agency WATERS Data 1.3,
and Southern Alliance for Clean Energy.

Location Eden, NC 27288
Plant Capacity 290 MW
No. of Boilers 3
Year Built 1949
No. of Ash Storage Facilities 4
Status Retired
Nearest Water Body Dan River
Region / Subregion South Atlantic-Gulf Region / Chowan-Roanoke
River Basin / Subbasin Roanoke / Upper Dan
Local Support Group Dan River Basin Association, 336-627-6270

Contamination

According to the report In Harm`s Way from the Environmental Integrity Project and January 2012 monitoring reports from the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, pollutants at this contamination site include high levels of chromium, iron, lead, manganese, silver, total dissolved solids and sulfate.

In February 2014, the third largest coal ash spill in U.S. history occurred at the Dan River Power Station when a storm water pipe beneath the ash impoundments ruptured, spilling tens of thousands of gallons of coal ash and contaminated wastewater into the Dan River. Water quality testing revealed dangerously high levels of arsenic, chromium, lead and other coal ash toxics. Please see our Dan River spill page for related news, press releases, video and more.

Additional groundwater testing data for this site is available below.


Ash Impoundments

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified ponds at various plants based on utility self-reporting. EPA has not provided complete information for every pond and in some cases has not even provided a name. For this reason, certain fields may be empty.

The data below is compiled from the Environmental Protection Agency coal ash Information Collection Request (ICR) Steam Electric Questionnaire distributed to utilities in 2010. The below data comes from a Freedom of Information Act response to Earthjustice and the Environmental Integrity Project produced by EPA in June 2012, because this data has not been officially released to the public.

Hazard Rating levels are from EPA assessments of the amount of potential damage that would be caused by a dam failure or misoperation. You can find out more information on our Hazard Ratings page.

The Environmental Protection Agency released the following additional documents assessing the structural integrity of coal ash impoundments at many power plants. This information is updated on an ongoing basis, so check back frequently for new information.

In addition to the EPA's dam safety inspections, North Carolina sent out its own inspectors recently to check on the state's coal ash dams. Their inspections, as you'll see in this factsheet, were a little more strict than the EPA's, and identified 29 high risk coal ash dams at plants operated by Duke Energy. You can see more information about the NC hazard ratings and about documented damage from NC's coal ash dams in this factsheet from Earthjustice and the Waterkeeper Alliance.

Impoundments
Click on the impoundment name for details.

Impoundment
Name
Hazard
Rating
Condition
Rating*
Capacity
(gallons)
Dam Height
(feet)
Unlined Impoundments
1. Primary Pond High Fair 155,431,131 60
2. Secondary Pond High Fair 60,934,217 27
Lining Unknown
3. Active Dry Ash Storage Landfill Not Rated Not Rated unknown
4. Closed Dry Ash Storage Landfill Not Rated Not Rated unknown

216,365,348 total known gallons

39 total known acres

* Condition ratings are based on EPA Assessment Reports.


Groundwater Testing Data

Environmental action groups across North Carolina worked together to get groundwater monitoring data for NC's coal fired power plants from the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources (NCDENR). Groundwater monitoring data for this plant, highlighting contaminants that are leaking into groundwater at levels above EPA standards, can be found in this Excel spreadsheet,
or in this PDF.

To learn more about coal ash in North Carolina including trends, regulations, pollution issues and community impacts,
please visit the North Carolina Coal Ash Issues