Ineffective State Coal Ash Programs

 

Because there are no federal rules regarding coal ash, protecting Americans from coal ash pollution is left to the states. Unfortunately, state programs are woefully inadequate, and vary widely from state to state, leaving citizens and industry with uncertainty. Even Tennessee, home of the tragic Kingston coal ash disaster, does not have safeguards designed to prevent future structural disasters or address ongoing groundwater contamination. This report from Earthjustice highlights the failure of state programs across the country.

The following table shows state-specific requirements for selected states in the Southeast.

See our state-specific pages for more information on coal ash in each Southeastern state.

 

 

 

SE Coal Ash Storage Requirements

Storage Requirement, by StateALFLGAKYMSNCSCTNVA
Require groundwater monitoring at all new and existing pondsNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNo
Require groundwater monitoring at all new and existing landfillsNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNo
Require composite liners for all new pondsNoNoNoNo NoNoNoNo No
Require composite liners for all new landfillsYesNoNoNoNoYesNoNoNo
Prohibit ash ponds from being constructed in the water tableNoNoNoNoNoYesNoNoNo
Prohibit coal ash landfills from being constructed in the water tableYesNoNoNoNoYesNoNoNo
Require financial assurance for coal ash pondsNoNoYesNoNoNoNoNoNo
Require financial assurance for coal ash landfillsYesNoYesNoNoYesYesNoNo
Data compiled by Earthjustice and Appalachian Mountain Advocates. From "State of Failure: How States Fail to Protect Our Health and Drinking Water from Toxic Coal Ash"